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SEWING HEADLINES & STORIES


Here you will find various useful news items, articles, notifications of events and sewing updates to keep you busy and engaged.

Simply click on the news item to read in full.

News

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  • 3 Dec 2019 10:00 AM | Louise Sparrow (Administrator)

    If you are a regular visitor to the ASG website, you will have discovered a new and colourful site. It was time for a face-lift – we hope you like it.

    All the same information is still available, but we have tried to make it easier for you to access. For example, the resources in All About Sewing/Sewing Skills Library can now be accessed directly from the page. These resources are for members only, so you will be prompted to log in when you click on a link (if you are not already logged in). Likewise, instructions for all the past sew-alongs can be downloaded from the All About Sewing/Sew-Alongs page.

    We’ve added a News page where you will find sewing-related articles, information about upcoming events and other items that might be of interest. This will be the page to go to between the bi-monthly AUSSEW Newsletter.

    There’s also an online store where we sell both physical and digital products. All the Sew-Along instruction packs are in the shop, for non-members to purchase. Remember, as an ASG member, you get these FREE by downloading directly from the Sew-Alongs page.

    Be sure to check out the Industry Partners Directory for any discounts and special offers for ASG members. And, of course, we want to support all these businesses as much as possible.

    Less exciting, but still important, is the information In the Members Only section (under Membership). The Documents and Resources page is where you will find forms and templates, annual reports, ASG policies, insurance certificates of currency, etc. There is also a Frequently Asked Questions page (FAQs) about operational procedures. If you are not sure how to update your personal profile or get a copy of your latest renewal invoice, this is the place to look. Guild officers can use this page to check on procedures for managing a Group or a Region.

  • 3 Dec 2019 10:00 AM | Louise Sparrow (Administrator)

    Thank you to everyone who joined us at the ASG Spring Gathering. It was a fantastic day, despite Melbourne’s very uncooperative weather.

    Our five fitters were kept on their toes! They fitted everyone who booked, squeezed in a few extra people and garments and even measured two ladies. We are looking forward to photos of lovely garments finished by our members.


    Anne Whalley presented very inspiring information and we are expecting more garments to come from our members. Everyone was motivated to start sewing again!

    The fabric swap was a success, even if it proved that some of us just love fabric too much!

    A number of members found gorgeous pieces for their new favourites and some ladies went home with just as much fabric as they brought, in different colours.

    Matt, our mobile sharpener, sharpened over 50 various scissors and a few knifes.

    Tatyana Anderson
    Special Events Coordinator, Victoria

      

     


  • 3 Dec 2019 10:00 AM | Louise Sparrow (Administrator)

    ASG member Wendy McKinnon reports on her visit to The Dressmaker Costume Exhibition

    In July, I travelled to The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia, Canberra, to see The Dressmaker Costume Exhibition curated by the indomitable Marion Boyce. This is an exhibition of costumes designed by two Australians, Marion Boyce and Margot Wilson, for the movie The Dressmaker. No movie in recent times has brought home the message more, that we are what we wear!


    The designers enjoyed making costumes for a movie set in the 1950s. What made it more interesting, the movie is set in an Australian Outback town. The costumes had to convey a message, as well as create a character so that, when the actors climbed into those costumes, they became those characters. The storyline is about a Paris-trained dressmaker of couture garments, wronged by the townspeople, home to gain her revenge. As if that wasn’t enough, Tilly transformed the lives of downtrodden, dowdy women and made them magnificent. Using garments – their colour, design lines, silhouettes and glorious fabrics - lives were changed.

    For early scenes, fabrics were aged and stained. Designs, while reflective of the times, were simple, to convey a feeling of hopelessness – these women had lost their souls. Along came the House of Tilly and their world was turned upside down. Of course, with success and acknowledgement comes jealousy. Enter the House of Una, a dressmaker brought in by a malicious Mother-of-the-Groom. Who could forget the dreadful wedding dress that was so, literally, over-inflated with voluminous skirts and tulle that, when the on-set Health & Safety officer approached the actress with his concerns over her falling during her dramatic scene, the actress responded by telling him not to worry – she would bounce! Having made her way to Tilly, she married in a beautiful Grecian inspired wedding dress!

    I was at once fascinated and thrilled to learn that Kate Winslet attended a sewing course before coming to Australia so that she would fully understand sewing terminologies and cutting lines. All the same, she found it a challenge working with such an old machine as the wonderful Singer. Kate worked every day with the designer, involved in the whole process.

    Also of note was how, through the use of pale and lack lustre fabrics, in keeping with Outback colours, characters were portrayed, setting the scene. As a character became stronger and more confident, this was reflected in the stronger colours they wore.

    Accessories also had to be sourced and everything on set had to reflect the 1950s. The hardest part for the designers was sourcing the fabrics of that period, travelling the world in their search. We don’t stop to think how some of the more complicated, and beautiful, fabric weaves are no longer around. These were the hardest to source so they did very well in their quest!

    I thoroughly enjoyed the exhibition and Marion’s curation told the story of how clothes maketh the man/woman; as well as maketh the movie - it was wonderful!

  • 3 Dec 2019 10:00 AM | Louise Sparrow (Administrator)

    Did you listen to stories via the radio when you were knee high to a grasshopper?

    When you’re sewing on your own, do you want to have someone to listen to so you feel less lonely?

    Sometimes the radio stations in your area just aren’t your cup of tea. Well now you can choose who to keep you company when you’re alone in your sewing room. They’re called podcasts. I know. Who would have thought!

    Podcasts have been around for about 14 years. It used to be called audio blogging. Some people have word blogs. Others have video blogs. Podcasts are audio blogs.

    Yes, podcasts are internet radio so that means you can find thousands to choose from. 1.6 million Australians listen to podcasts in an average four weeks.

    The most obvious way to listen to a podcast is to play it directly through that podcast’s website on your computer. For example, go to Seworganisedstylepodcast.com and click on the episodes page

    Most Podcasts have a play function directly on their episode pages.

    On Sew Organised Style, the play function is always at the top of each episode page. Click on the link to listen to the podcast.

    And there you go. You’re listening to a podcast.

    Are podcasts free?

    There are an amazing number of free podcasts available. Sew Organised Style podcast is a free podcast produced by Australians, featuring Australians to the world, with a smattering of well-known sewing community identities that want to speak to our Australian producers.

    Can I listen to podcasts on my phone?

    Yes. In the US, 22% of people listen to podcasts in their car. In Australia, 75% of podcast listeners listen to podcasts on their phones.

    Podcast vs sewing friend

    • A podcast can be with you or be switched off. A sewing friend can’t.
    • A podcast can be with you when you need someone. A sewing friend can’t.
    • A podcast doesn’t need a cup of coffee and cake when they’re with you. A sewing friend does.
    • Keep your sewing friends for ASG events. They do come in handy and they’re always available for coffee and cake.
  • 3 Dec 2019 10:00 AM | Louise Sparrow (Administrator)

    Perth was buzzing on the evening of 9 November when 150 people descended on Arthur & Co at Hibernian Place to celebrate the art of sewing. In recent years, ASG Industry Partner Sew for Life hosted the Perth Sewcial Soiree. This year members of two ASG groups – VIC Park Sewcialists and Maylands Sewcial Club – took the reins and re-badged the event. Perth Frocktails was born and was a huge success.

    Here’s a sampling of pics from the evening. There are too many to include in this newsletter so be sure to visit @_perth_frocktails (Instagram) to feast your eyes.

                  
  • 3 Dec 2019 10:00 AM | Louise Sparrow (Administrator)

    This is a story of three community groups coming together with a common goal of helping women and men with breast cancer. They are Solaris Cancer Care, The Embroiderers Guild of WA and the Australian Sewing Guild.

    Fay Boyd (member of the Embroiderers Guild), on a visit to Melbourne, was shown a kit for those undergoing breast cancer treatment and recovery by a friend who found it most useful. Permission was given from the originator, with great delight, to bring the concept with some modifications to Perth.

    The “Comfort Kit” consists of a cushion worn under the arm after surgery while in bed or under items of clothing during recuperation and a drainage bottle bag that may be required during treatment. This can also double as a carry bag for any X-ray CDs you may have. Also included is a small gift.

    Fay is a long term volunteer/supporter of Solaris Cancer Care and a member of The Embroiderers Guild of WA (Claremont Group). Karina Barlow is also a member of The Embroiderers Guild of WA (Claremont Group) and the Australian Sewing Guild (Western Suburbs Group). Between them they have a team of volunteers who cut out the patterns and assist with the sewing up of the cushions and drainage bags. Fay then provides the finishing touches to the kits for gifting by the Cancer Co-Ordinator at St.John of God hospital in Subiaco, where they are well received.

    The ladies from the Claremont Group have a cutting out day once or twice a year where they cut out the cushions and drainage bags from donated fabrics. Karina then takes them to the Western Suburbs Group who have a charity day making up the cushions. This whole operation has been going on for three years, providing much needed help to cancer sufferers.

    Many thanks to all for their contribution enabling a free, useful and attractive gift to cancer patients of Western Australia.


  • 3 Dec 2019 9:46 AM | Louise Sparrow (Administrator)

    Last month we featured Janet Zekulich (ASG member in WA) in one of our Facebook posts. Janet made this gorgeous dress using the FREE pattern from Violette Fields Threads.

    Janet tells us about her sewing journey.

    "Mum was a Stanley School for Sewing graduate and was a passionate and gifted sewist. The sewing machine was in constant use in our very organised household. Those were the days, you probably all remember. Mum would wash Monday, clean Tuesday, iron Wednesday and sew Thursday.

    At eight I was designing and creating doll clothes. I would sit on the floor when mum was sewing, collect the scraps and make dresses for my dolls.

    My first machine was a Bernina. This was a whole new world - suits, dresses, shorts - I was hooked.

    My other great passion, classical dance, meant I could sew costumes. I made ballet cardigans and leotards which were so popular, I was asked to make them for a shop. My domestic Bernina did an amazing job but I invested in a Juki Industrial Overlocker. This meant I could do mass production on a grand scale.

    My expertise came to the attention of the local Bernina shop in Midland where I have now worked for the last 8 years.

    In August 2015, I was introduced to ASG Foothills Sew and Sews where I passionately enjoyed ‘sharing and furthering the art of sewing’. Opportunities always arise for me to help ladies who do not know how to use certain feet on their machines or need patient help with threading overlockers.  Another thing about the ASG is a camaraderie and friendship which is the ‘fabric’ to keep us interested."


  • 17 Nov 2019 12:04 PM | Louise Sparrow (Administrator)

    Are you looking for a new sewing adventure?

    Patternmaker and sewing teacher Elizabeth Haywood offers 16 wearable projects, cleverly designed to use 100% of the fabric, with no scraps or waste.

    Zero waste patternmaking is one strategy for making fashion more sustainable and can also result in innovative garment shapes.

    This book presents a variety of zero waste cutting themes, some new, some historical, but all influenced by the cloth itself.

    Follow the clear step-by-step instructions to maximise your fabric usage, grow in confidence  and create versatile garments you’ll enjoy wearing.

    ISBN-13: 978-0-646-80802-4
    144 pages
    Spine width 10mm
    RRP: $AU44.99, $US34.99, £24.99, €29.99

    Released March 2020

    Click here for a sneak peek of the projects you will find in the book


  • 5 Nov 2019 5:29 PM | Anonymous

    Visit the Children's Art Centre to explore fashion and adornment through fun hands-on and multimedia activities created by four artists from Australia and the Pacific

    10 August 2019 to 15 March 2020

    GOMA, Brisbane

    FIND OUT MORE


  • 5 Nov 2019 5:24 PM | Anonymous

    Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons is one of the most visionary and influential fashion designers working today.

    Since the late 1970s, her intent has always been ‘to make clothes that didn’t exist before’ and she has consistently defied convention to redefine fashion.

    Season after season, Kawakubo’s designs have ‘deconstructed’ garment shape and function, reframed ideas of beauty, and proposed a new relationship between body and dress.

    Collecting Comme examines the radical concepts and design methods that have informed Kawakubo’s practice since 1981, the year she first presented in Paris.

    Featuring more than fifty examples drawn from the NGV’s significant Comme des Garçons holdings, generously gifted to the Gallery by Takamasa Takahashi, and supported by additional loans from his archive, the exhibition highlights key collections and recurrent themes in Kawakubo’s work. The designs of two of her protégés, Junya Watanabe and Tao Kurihara also feature.

    A self-described ‘Comme tragic’, Takahashi’s profound appreciation of Kawakubo’s work permeates this exhibition, which considers the originality of Comme des Garçons’ contribution to contemporary fashion.

    31 October 2019 to 26 July 2020

    National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

    FIND OUT MORE



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